10 ways to help an elderly person who is lonely

Do you know someone who might need a bit of company? Here’s some ways to help them feel less lonely.

how-to-help-someone-who-is-lonely-136423298055803901-171129103940.jpg

You might not be lonely, but someone you know very well could be.

Not sure how to help them? Lucy Harmer, Director of Services at Independent Age, the older people’s charity, gives her expert tips on how to support someone who is experiencing feelings of loneliness.

1. Show them you’re available

Keep in touch by phone, email or in person so they know someone is there for them when they need support. Don’t give up on them if they don’t call or visit you in return, but if they need time alone, try to respect that.

2. Offer to take them out

If it’s difficult for them to get out and about, you could volunteer to take them out, for example to a café or to visit a friend. There might even be a local charity who could help if you don’t have much spare time. Just don’t push them into anything, as it might seem daunting to them at first.

3. Ask how they’re feeling

By talking to them about how they’re feeling, without leading them into any particular issue, you might find out that something else is troubling them. Try not to make assumptions about why they are lonely – there are many reasons why someone might be feeling loneliness.

4. Enlist expert help

Some people might feel more comfortable talking about their feelings to a stranger or professional. If it seems appropriate, you could suggest they speak to their GP or call a charity helpline.

5. Be dependable

Missing a visit or phone call may not seem important to you, but could be very disappointing for someone who doesn’t have much contact with others, so try to be reliable.

6. Help them discover new ways to stay in touch

There are a huge range of different ways to stay in touch these days, from social media to email and text messaging. If they don’t feel comfortable using computers, you could encourage them to join a course to learn how to use computers and the internet, which are run by most local councils.

7. Help them to try something new

If they have a particular interest, joining a group, such as a rambling club, reading group or dance class, could help them connect with like-minded people. If they show an interest in an activity, you could offer to go with them to the first session if they’re nervous about going alone.

8. Talk about practical barriers

Barriers such as not having a car, not having enough money or being a full-time carer could be preventing them from connecting with people or getting out and about. Talk to them about what these barriers may be and encourage them to speak to Independent Age on 0800 319 6789 for help overcoming them.

9. Ask other people for help

If you’re very busy or live far away, you don’t need to feel like you have to do everything yourself. See if anyone else, such as a friend, neighbour, relative or charity volunteer, can regularly call or visit the person who is lonely.

10. Become a volunteer

If you’re looking for other ways to help people who are lonely, you could try volunteering with Independent Age. We’re currently looking for people to make regular phone calls to older people. Get involved by calling 020 7605 4255 or log on to independentage.org/volunteer

 

The charity has just launched a new, free advice guide, called If you’re feeling lonely: How to stay connected in older age, which can be ordered for free via independentage.org/lonely-guide or by calling 0800 319 6789.

 

Source: http://home.bt.com/lifestyle/health/wellne...